What’s the secret to achieving true 200Gbps Ethernet traffic in a Smart NIC? Netcope says: two PCIe slots and a Virtex UltraScale+ FPGA

2017年11月30日 | By News | Filed in: News.

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When Xcell Daily last looked at Netcope Technologies’ NFB-200G2QL FPGA-based 200G Ethernet Smart NIC with its cool NASA-scoop heat sink in August, it had broken industry records for 100GbE performance with a throughput of 148.8M packets/sec on DPDK (the Data Plane Development Kit)—the theoretical maximum for 64-byte packets over 100GbE. (See “Netcope breaks 100GbE record @ 148.8M packets/sec (the theoretical max) with NFB-100G2Q FPGA-based NIC, then goes faster at 200GbE.”) At the time, all Netcope would say was that the NFB-200G2QL PCIe card was “based on a Xilinx Virtex UltraScale+ FPGA.” Well, Netcope was at SC17 in Denver earlier this month and has been expanding the capabilities of the board. It’s now capable of sending or receiving packets at a 200Gbps line rate with zero packet loss, still using “the latest Xilinx FPGA chip Virtex UltraScale+,” which I was told at Netcope’s SC17 booth is a Xilinx Virtex UltraScale+ VU7P FPGA.

 

 

 

Netcope NFB-200G2QL Programmable NIC.jpg 

 

 

Netcope Technologies’ NFB-200G2QL 200G Ethernet Smart NIC based on a Virtex UltraScale+ FPGA

 

 

 

One trick to doing this: using two PCIe Gen3 x16 slots to get packets to/from the server CPU(s). Why two slots? Because Netcope discovered that its 200G Smart NIC PCIe card could transfer about 110Gbps worth of packets over one PCIe Gen3 x16 slot and the theoretical maximum traffic throughput for one such slot is 128Gbps. That means 200Gbps will not pass through the eye of this 1-slot needle. Hence the need for two PCIe slots, which will carry the 200Gbps worth of packets with a comfortable margin. Where’s that second PCIe Gen3 interface coming from? Over a cable attached to the Smart NIC board and implemented in the board’s very same Xilinx Virtex UltraScale+ VU7P FPGA, of course. The company has written a White Paper describing this technique titled “Overcoming the Bandwidth Limitations of PCI Express.”

 

And yes, there’s a short video showing this Netcope sorcery as well:

 

 

 

 

 

IT.数码

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November 30, 2017 at 04:20AM


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