Danger: 100GbE! BittWare’s StreamSleuth safely processes packets at 100Gbps using FPGA hardware acceleration from [guess who]

2017年2月11日 | By News | Filed in: News.

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Danger 100GbE.jpg As the BittWare video below explains, CPUs are simply not able to process 100GbE packet traffic without hardware acceleration. BittWare’s new Streamsleuth, to be formally unveiled at next week’s RSA Conference in San Francisco (Booth S312), adroitly handles blazingly fast packet streams thanks to a hardware assist from an FPGA. And as the subhead in the title slide of the video presentation says, StreamSleuth lets you program its FPGA-based packet-processing engine “without the hassle of FPGA programming.”

 

(Translation: you don’t need Verilog or VHDL proficiency to get this box working for you. You get all of the FPGA’s high-performance goodness without the bother.)

 

 

 

BittWare StreamSleuth.jpg 

 

 

That said, as BittWare’s Network Products VP & GM Craig Lund explains, this is not an appliance that comes out of the box ready to roll. You need (and want) to customize it. You might want to add packet filters, for example. You might want to actively monitor the traffic. And you definitely want the StreamSleuth to do everything at wire-line speeds, which it can. “But one thing you do not have to do, says Lund, “is learn how to program an FPGA.” You still get the performance benefits of FPGA technology—without the hassle. That means that a much wider group of network and data-center engineers can take advantage of BittWare’s StreamSleuth.

 

As Lund explains, “100GbE is a different creature” than prior, slower versions of Ethernet. Servers cannot directly deal with 100GbE traffic and “that’s not going to change any time soon.” The “network pipes” are now getting bigger than the server’s internal “I/O pipes.” This much traffic entering a server this fast clogs the pipes and also causes “cache thrash” in the CPU’s L3 cache.

 

Sounds bad, doesn’t it?

 

What you want is to reduce the network traffic of interest down to something a server can look at. To do that, you need filtering. Lots of filtering. Sophisticated filtering. More sophisticated filtering than what’s available in today’s commodity switches and firewall appliances. Ideally, you want a complete implementation of the standard BPF/pcap filter language running at line rate on something really fast, like a packet engine implemented in a highly parallel FPGA.

 

The same thing holds true for attack mitigation at 100Gbe line rates. Commodity switching hardware isn’t going to do this for you at 100GbE (10GbE yes but 100GbE, “no way”) and you can’t do it in software at these line rates. “The solution is FPGAs” says Lund, and BittWare’s StreamSleuth with FPGA-based packet processing gets you there now.

 

Software-based defenses cannot withstand Denial of Service (DoS) attacks at 100GbE line rates. FPGA-accelerated packet processing can.

 

So what’s that FPGA inside of the BittWare Streamsleuth doing? It comes preconfigured for packet filtering, load balancing, and routing. (“That’s a Terabit router in there.”) To go beyond these capabilities, you use the BPF/pcap language to program your requirements into the the StreamSleuth’s 100GbE packet processor using a GUI or APIs. That packet processor is implemented with a Xilinx Virtex UltraScale+ VU9P FPGA.

 

Here’s what the guts of the BittWare StreamSleuth look like:

 

 

BittWare StreamSleuth Exploded Diagram.jpg 

 

And here’s a block diagram of the StreamSleuth’s packet processor:

 

 

 

BittWare StreamSleuth Packet Processor Block Diagram.jpg 

 

 

The Virtex UltraScale+ FPGA resides on a BittWare XUPP3R PCIe board. If that rings a bell, perhaps you read about that board here in Xcell Daily last November. (See “BittWare’s UltraScale+ XUPP3R board and Atomic Rules IP run Intel’s DPDK over PCIe Gen3 x16 @ 150Gbps.”)

 

Finally, here’s the just-released BittWare StreamSleuth video with detailed use models and explanations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about the StreamSleuth, contact BittWare directly or go see the company’s StreamSleuth demo at next week’s RSA conference. For more information about the packet-processing capabilities of Xilinx All Programmable devices, click here. And for information about the new Xilinx Reconfigurable Acceleration Stack, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

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February 11, 2017 at 12:30AM


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